This weekend’s Super Bowl


We live in the San  Francisco Bay Area, so the Super Bowl is of special interest to us.  In going through my messages today, I ran across this post from “Faith in the Game”.  I think it will mean a lot to you, as it did to me.

The storyline has gotten a lot of attention these last couple of weeks, but as most anyone who follows sports knows, this weekend’s Super Bowl will be the first ever pitting two brothers against each other as head coaches of the competing teams. Jim Harbaugh’s San Francisco 49ers are slight favorites over older brother John Harbaugh’s Baltimore Ravens. When this matchup began to look real, I imagined what it would be like to sit in the skybox at this game with Harbaughs’ parents. You look at one team and see your son making the game’s big decision. You look at the other team and feel the same anxiety. Then, if you’re Jack Harbaugh, the family patriarch, you realize that something you said consistently during the childhood of both men has translated into this Great Moment.

“Who’s got it better than us?” was a constant question in the Harbaugh household. As the story goes, it’s a question that Jack, the father, presented to his three children—sons John and Jim and daughter Joani—often while driving them to school or practice. Their answer from the backseat was just as consistent as the question. “Noo-body,” the children would respond as if it was the magic key that unlocked the car door.

It appears that simple family Q&A created the password for a remarkable moment in NFL history. Jack, a lifelong coach at the collegiate level, gets to watch from the skybox as his boys lead their teams. It’s a coaching accomplishment without precedent. When it comes to NFL success this season, nobody has been better than a Harbaugh.

The lesson here is embedded in the confident philosophy of Jack Harbaugh. No matter their circumstance growing up—and as an itinerant coach, the family moved often from city to city, one small house to the next—he never let his kids feel overwhelmed by their surroundings. The constant reminder to be grateful of their own situations helped fuel them to create future successes. Rather than dwelling on petty comparisons of the haves and the have-nots, the Harbaughs developed a mindset that assured them they possessed all they needed to effectively pursue greatness.

It’s a mentality that Jim Harbaugh took into his 49ers locker room. From team T-shirts with the slogan to the constant yelling of the “Who’s got it better than us?” phrase in the team huddle, the 49ers have made it their goal to let their performances on the field mirror the accompanying “Noo-body!” response.

The story made me think: What words were said to you that left that kind of impact? What words have you said that others carry with them today? Think about the final words you say each day to your kids and loved ones. Could those words or actions be the fuel needed to drive them into their own greatness?

Make a difference today.

Overcoming discouragement brings great blessing


 Are you a “big picture” person?

(My Note: Considering the previous message on the site today, I think this one was also “right on” and meant for me to contemplate today.  Funny how that happens, huh?)

Who but God goes up to the heaven and comes back down? Who holds the wind in his fist? Who wraps up the oceans in his cloak? Who has created the whole wide world? What is his name — and his son’s name? Tell me if you know!

Proverbs 30:4 NLT

Impressive panorama

When people understand events clearly, we often say that they “see the big picture.” This passage in Proverbs makes the point that the clearest view of the “big picture” will always include God. The sequence of rhetorical questions helps us consider the awesome identity and capacity of God. Much like the litany of questions that God showered on Job (Job 38:1-41:34), these push us toward humble and silent worship.

Agur was feeling overwhelmed (30:1), insignificant (30:2), and limited (30:3). But when he turned away from his smallness to contemplate God’s greatness, an atmosphere of confidence filled the rest of the chapter. He began with a little picture, no bigger than himself, but he soon looked at the big picture and forgot that he was weary and worn out. God gave him a new and refreshing point of view.

WISE WAYS  One of the best remedies for a weary and tired spirit is to contemplate the majesty and greatness of God. How have you found that to be true?

Dear Lord, when I look at all you have made, I know it makes me feel smaller, but it also fills me with wonder over how great you are! I worship you.

Adapted from The One Year® Book of Proverbs by Neil S. Wilson, Tyndale House Publishers (2002), entry for January 30.


Content is derived from the Holy Bible, New Living Translation and other publications of Tyndale Publishing House

Look up!


God wants you to stop being “absorbed with the things right in front of you.

Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—

that’s where the action is.

See things from his perspective”.

(Colossians 3:2 MSG)

If I ever needed to hear this verse, today was the day! I’m having a rough time facing the fact that my sister’s leukemia has now progressed and she will be starting chemo soon.  Also, it seems, people who are “supposed friends”, just simply “aren’t”.  So I need to look up, and try to see it all in “God’s perspective”.

Six terrific truths about Time


Here are :

First: Nobody can manage time. But you can manage those things that take up your time.

Second: Time is expensive. As a matter of fact, 80 percent of our day is spent on those things or those people that only bring us two percent of our results.

Third: Time is perishable. It cannot be saved for later use.

Fourth: Time is measurable. Everybody has the same amount of time…pauper or king. It is not how much time you have; it is how much you use.

Fifth: Time is irreplaceable. We never make back time once it is gone.

Sixth: Time is a priority. You have enough time for anything in the world, so long as it ranks high enough among your priorities.